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    Other Side Of Maleficent

    I have been looking forward to Maleficent with equal amounts of anticipation and dread. On one hand, she is easily my favorite Disney villain, so cold and so pure, and I want desperately to see more of her and her back-story. On the other hand, she is easily my favorite Disney villain, and I would hate to see her parodied, taken lightly or ultimately destroyed in a film that does not understand this great character. The good news is that this film almost gets it right; but that is also the bad news.

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    BCDB Hits 150K Entries

    It took a while, but we are finally here! The Big Cartoon DataBase hit the milestone of 150,000 entries earlier today with the addition of the cartoon The Polish Language. This film was added to BCDB on May 9th, 2014 at 4:23 PM.

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    Warner Brings Back Animated Stone-Age Family

    Funnyman Will Ferrell and partner Adam McKay are working on bringing back everyone’s favorite stone-age family. The duo’s production company Gary Sanchez Productions is in development on a new Flintstones animated feature.

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    Disney To Feast In France

    The follow up to Disney’s 2013 Academy Award Winning short Paperman has been announced, and it will premiere at France’s Annecy International Animated Film Festival. Titled The Feast, the short looks to be based on the same stylized CG techniques used on last years Paperman, a more natural and hand-drawn look to computer animation.

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    Renegades of Animation: Pat Sullivan

    Pat Sullivan became famous worldwide for his creation of Felix the Cat. What most animation histories gloss over is Sullivan’s checkered past and longtime standing as a wildcat renegade. He didn’t follow the rules. And he made damn sure to fully protect his intellectual properties.

The ups and downs of cartoons as a whole

Discussion in 'Other / Multiple Studios' started by Humperdinck, Apr 23, 2014.

  1. Humperdinck

    Humperdinck Apprentice Forum Member New Member

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    In this thread I would like to start a discussion on the state of the cartoon industry as a whole, as opposed to just one cartoon or studio. To me the industry is currently going through a rough patch. Cartoons today seem to pander strictly to a very young audience. It seems as though network executives have given up on any teen or adult audiences, probably because they feel they have already lost them to the internet and social media. However I'm sure if quality programs were being put out, they would gain back a significant chunk of the audience they have lost in recent years.
    To expand on this, I believe their have been two "golden ages" of cartoons. The first was in the 1940s. Obviously around that time Looney Tunes (and Merrie Melodies) were in full swing creating animated brilliance. It was a solid decade of interesting characters, surprising situations, and laugh out loud humor. Not to mention World War 2 had a huge impact on cartoons at the time, and it was a pretty positive influence. Even the propaganda cartoons are hugely entertaining. It was a great time.
    The 50s kinda saw things slow down. Things weren't near as bad as they are now though, just a bit slower than the previous decade. The 60s saw the emerge of some great ones (Flintstones, Jetsons) but still not as solid overall as the 40s. About the same can be said for the 70s, to a lesser extent.
    The 1980s came extremely close to being the second golden age of cartoons. I wouldn't even really be turned off if some did consider it that. A major influx of classic toons (GI Joe, The Smurfs, TMNT, Transformers, etc) made the 80s a great time for cartoons. I still don't feel that it was as solid as the 40s. As opposed to being the second golden age, I think it was more like a prologue for the second golden age.
    And now for what is the second golden age of cartoons, the 90s. The 90s started off with the creative birth of Nickelodeon with The Ren and Stimpy Show & Rugrats heading the charge. Not to mention The Simpsons also marked the start of the 90s, and thanks to that we got to see "adult" cartoons evolve over the decade and become a permanent fixture in cartoons. At about the mid 90s, close to late, we saw Cartoon Network (CN) come racing in with its time of brilliance. From the late 90s to the early 2000s it was amazing at how CN and Nick were continuously outdoing each other in terms of quality and fan appreciation. They and other networks made the 90s and early 00s a great period of animation, just magnificent.
    But as I mentioned earlier I feel that in the modern day the cartoon industry is bleeding out and it needs a tourniquet. Modern day cartoons seem to pander only to the very young, as opposed to also appealing to teens and adults who have been dedicated cartoon lovers. Quality cartoons are in the minority right now, which explains why Anime is at an all time high. People are turning away from cartoons, and we can't let this happen to one of the greatest art forms ever created by man. We need to make our voices heard, and get involved if possible. Don't let merchandising and lazy studios take away what we have loved for decades.
    So, please offer replies and your own opinion on my rant and the issue itself. Do you agree? Are cartoons better right now or worse? What do you think was the best time period for cartoons?
  2. emeraldisle

    emeraldisle Moderator Staff Member I SUPPORT BCDB!

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    Cartoonwise, all I watch now is Ben 10, or my many Hanna-Barbera DVD's. I do like many theatrical shorts, but not enough to watch 24/7.
  3. saltyboot

    saltyboot A Moderating Moderator Staff Member Forum Member

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    My favorite cartoon era is the 1940's. Specifically the LT/MM shorts, followed by Disney. I agree that things started to slow down in the 1950's. I would say generally, about 1955 and on. The 1990's are also a great decade for cartoons. As for today's cartoons, I think not. The new ones I see advertised look horrible. Modern T.V. toons have been bad for a while. Not all of them, but most.
  4. Humperdinck

    Humperdinck Apprentice Forum Member New Member

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    Children's cartoons have especially gone downhill. I can't stand to watch at least 3/4 of the programs broadcast by the major animation networks
  5. artytoons

    artytoons Administrator I SUPPORT BCDB! Forum Member New Member

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    In the late 1960s and 1970s as a response to violent cartoons (and real-life events such as the Vietnam War, race riots, and the Assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy, and Martin Luther King Jr.), there was a call by tv networks under pressure from watchdog groups for more educational content in Saturday Morning animation. The comedy content was increased and superhero/space action cartoons were eased out of the schedules. Lessons were taught. Since the tv networks made that mandatory, animation studios had to comply or else their programs would not air and animator employment would decrease.

    The 1980s saw the advent of toy-based cartoons...the manufacturers of the toys had the budget for 5 day a week production for weekday syndication to promote their products. If done with wit and memorable characters and storylines...toy-based cartoons can be entertaining in a creative sense (like Transformers, My Little Pony, He-Man, and GI Joe).

    The 1990s saw Cartoon Network and other cable tv/satellite venues showing cartoons at various time slots, sometimes 24 hours a day. Network tv was cutting back on cartoons in favor of news programs on Saturday. There are still the strict guidelines with the cable channels on content to meet FCC rules.
  6. Glowworm

    Glowworm Moderator Staff Member I SUPPORT BCDB!

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    I hardly watch cartoons on tv anymore with a few exceptions--I do watch Legend of Korra (Although I have only seen a bit of Avatar the Last Airbender) and I do like Phineas and Ferb although I have not watched it in a while. I also have a huge weakness for Axe Cop--which is pretty awesome.

    However, I am an old school kind of cartoon lover- even as a child, I loved Rocky and Bullwinkle and Looney Tunes the most, although I also watched a lot of other things--being born in the late 80s, I got to watch a mixture of great stuff. These days, I tend to watch cartoons either online or on my DVDs.

    I do still watch a lot of animated movies in the theaters--however I am rather picky on what I chose to see these days.
  7. MrCleveland

    MrCleveland Animator Forum Member New Member

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    I only watch "Family Guy" and "American Dad"...there's NO middle-ground for cartoons anymore, that's why "Animaniacs" was awesome...I had Easter dinner with my family and we talked about the Tweety Cartoon called "I Tawt I Taw A Putty tat" where Catstillo (a caricature of Lou Costello) after hearing Babbot (caricature of Bud Abbot) shout "Gimme da Bird"...Catsillo quotes "If the Hayes Code would let me...I'd give him the bird"!...then 50 years later on "Animaniacs" that saying was used when the pilgrim said "Gimme the bird" then Yakko Warner said "We would, but the FOX censors won't let us"!

    Those quotes flew over my head as a child, but now while I'm older, I got the joke!
  8. Glowworm

    Glowworm Moderator Staff Member I SUPPORT BCDB!

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    It's actually "A Tale of Two Kitties" in which the Babbot and Catstello cats attempt to catch Tweety.
  9. MrCleveland

    MrCleveland Animator Forum Member New Member

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    Okay..."I Tawt I Taw A Puddy Tat" was the 1st time Tweety and Sylvester join together.
  10. Glowworm

    Glowworm Moderator Staff Member I SUPPORT BCDB!

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    Actually, it was "Tweetie Pie" --"I Taw a Putty Tat" was Sylvester and Tweety's second outing together.
  11. MrCleveland

    MrCleveland Animator Forum Member New Member

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    Okay...I haven't been watching Looney Tunes much lately...the cartoon genre that I love!
  12. Glowworm

    Glowworm Moderator Staff Member I SUPPORT BCDB!

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    Don't worry about it. I didn't become an expert over night myself.
  13. oneuglybunny

    oneuglybunny Moderator Staff Member Forum Member

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    For what it's worth, I'm seeing some promising submissions from both the Vancouver Film School and from the French Gobelins Cinematiques. For productions by animation students, some of them are real gems. Once these talented kids hit the pipeline, we might be seeing a renaissance in cartoon shorts.
    • Agree Agree x 2
  14. saltyboot

    saltyboot A Moderating Moderator Staff Member Forum Member

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    I agree with OUB. I've seen some really good student animations on YouTube. Hopefully, they will have the artistic freedom in their job at an animation studio.
  15. Glowworm

    Glowworm Moderator Staff Member I SUPPORT BCDB!

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    I concur with both of you. I've seen some really good student animations myself--and some equally awesome ones on deviantart.
  16. oneuglybunny

    oneuglybunny Moderator Staff Member Forum Member

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    I think it was Senior Member PeterHale who pointed out that studios need to take risks in their early days out in order to blip on the public's radar. A ground-breaking, experimental, rock-your-world production will get the green light out of necessity, namely an urgency to put something onto the big screen and into the marketplace. However, especially in the case of the Walt Disney Company, limits grow as to how far afield the studio is willing to go. For those longstanding, established studios, it's so much easier and more comfortable to stick to known and proven formulas and storylines, rather than break the comfortable mold.

    I believe that Cartoon Network has developed the same "comfortable mold" syndrome as Disney. Once upon a time, Cartoon Network had a limited supply of animation, culled mainly from the archives of pre-1948 Warner Brothers, MGM and UA studios, and Hanna-Barbera Studios. Most of this was amassed by media mogul Ted Turner, the founder of Cartoon Network. However, that supply has its limits; new material was needed urgently. Therefore, Cartoon Network aired the O Canada bloc and the What A Cartoon Show as vehicles to parade introductory efforts by cartoonists new and old, and gauge how well the viewing public receives them. This mechanism launched the careers of Efrem Partiblé and Craig McCracken and Richard Condie, as well as freshening the lineup of Cartoon Network. However, with age, Cartoon Network is not so comfortable with the new and the radical and the seminal; they'd much rather rehash the old familiar stalwarts, especially after they'd identified and focused on their target demographic.

    Essentially, in its early days, Cartoon Network welcomed the playful newbies, who brought vibrancy and freshness to the place. Nowadays, old man CN tends to cling to its dusty mementos and tell the "kids" to get off the lawn. 'Twas ever thus ...
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  17. 80swaver

    80swaver Newbie New Member

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    Sometimes, the networks try to create cartoons from games or concepts that they think will sell. But at times, it may not work or the results are unsatisfactory. Or if successful for a while, not lasting.
  18. Thinice

    Thinice Intern Forum Member New Member

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    List are always hard to put a finger on one way or the other.

    I love video games and remember buying a Turbo Graphix -16 just to be able to play Pac-Land. At the time Pac-Land was like being able to enjoy the cartoon anytime I wanted. We did not get a VHS system till after Pac-Man was off the air so playing Pac-Land was like reliving memories.

    I never watched or role played much of Dungeons and Dragons but still found the show interesting. The other shows are newer so they do not hold any nostalgic feelings for me.

    Another show that seems to be forgotten or left off is Bubsy. Bubsy was a single special but it seemed to receive a lot criticism. The game was released across several console platforms and must have sold well as it had a sequel video game release.

    I also noticed the Saturday Supercade or Dragons Lair cartoons were not added. They were enjoyable but had a short life span. Probably the demise was more to the video game crash then any other reason.

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